Creating Moments with Pandora | Wedding Style

Moments with PandoraCreating Moments with Pandora

Now that there’s less than six months to go to my wedding, I’ve begun thinking about all the little details. Things like bridal party gifts and the accessories I’ll wear on the day. I don’t think it will come as a surprise to anyone that I lean toward minimal accessories – both in style and numbers. When I choose a piece it has to be special, and it has to stand out, because I know it’s going to be worn a lot. I dedicate myself to my jewellery, and I expect it to do the same for me. In fact I like to think I’m a bit of a jewellery aficionado, as people are always asking me ‘ohhh where did you buy that?’ And I don’t plan for my wedding day outfit to be any different.

Creating Moments with Pandora

When Pandora recently invited me to The Ritz to view their new collection, I could hardly turn them down. I mean enjoying afternoon tea whilst surrounded by beautiful jewellery brings together two of my favourite things. I was certain it would also offer me some invaluable inspiration when it comes to accessorising my wedding dress.

The delicate pieces on display came in a variety of styles, from classic Pandora, to new exciting releases. As soon as I locked eyes on the Tribute Pendant Necklace I knew I wanted it. It was clearly Pandora, but it wasn’t screaming it at everyone who passed by. Simple, elegant, effortless – my ideal piece of jewellery. Meanwhile the Silver Sliding Bracelet Pandora gifted me on the day has been a lovely addition to my everyday wardrobe, and is definitely a contender for my bridal party gifts.

If you’re looking for bridal party gifts, or perhaps just a gift for a friend, do check out Pandora’s latest collection.
Read more from my Wedding Series.

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Why I Buy Expensive Clothing and You Should Too

Buy Expensive ClothingWhy I Buy Expensive Clothing and You Should Too

A few years ago I had an epiphany. I was doing fashion all wrong. I was spending a ton of money on cheap clothing that I didn’t really care about. It would fall apart after a few wears, and if it didn’t I would throw it out (read: give to charity) after only a few months. I decided it was time to change the way I viewed clothing. I decided it was time to start buying expensive clothing.

Before we get into things, I’d just like to say that this is in no way me boasting, let me make that clear. I save for all of my clothing, and I don’t buy anything when I don’t have the money to do so. I also realise that not everyone can save, and sometimes you just need or want to buy something inexpensive and trendy. At the end of the day this is just a simple guide for those who want to try and be a bit more conscious with their wardrobes.

Why I Buy Expensive Clothing

When I say expensive clothing I’m not talking about £500 t-shirts. I mean spending £30+ on a t-shirt or £100 on a pair of jeans etc. All of which are much cheaper than their designer counterparts, but relatively expensive compared to the fast fashion you find on the high street.

But why should you be spending more on clothing?

  • Fast fashion is…fast
    • It is not made to last. It’s trend based, which means that it has to be created quickly and cheaply (for the brand). This often means the wages and working conditions of the labourers creating the pieces is low too. I’m not saying more expensive brands are immune to this, but it’s certainly more prevalent in fast fashion brands.
  • Don’t buy trends, buy timeless
    • Trends can be cute & fun, but they’re also stressful to keep up with, as well as being heavy on the pocket. Consider buying pieces you can see yourself wearing over and over, for years to come. Example: a pair of quality jeans, or a fitted blouse.
  • Invest in quality over quantity
    • Honestly this should be my life motto because I throw it about so often. Quality pieces last, which means you don’t have to buy a new item of clothing every other month, year etc. Example: I try to only buy natural fabrics as they last longer and are much more comfortable. 
  • It actually saves money
    • Be considerate of how much you’re spending and what you’re spending it on. A few years ago I was buying countless amounts of clothing from high street brands, and I was actually spending more money (on a monthly basis) on clothing than I do now.
  • It helps you appreciate what you have
    • It’s quite easy to not put any value on fast fashion. It comes and goes with our tastes and trends. When you save for something it has meaning and sentiment. You’ll also be more likely to think twice before throwing out something expensive. I know I do!

Would you be willing to buy expensive clothing? Let me know in the comments!
Read more of my articles on wellbeing and style.

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The Line Drawing Trend | Style & Interior

line drawing

The end of 2017 saw line drawing become popular in a big way. It started with art prints, but quickly moved onto shirts, jewellery and more. From there the style slowly began to infiltrate the world of Instagram, as all the greats have done. Before we knew it, Instagrammers alike were sporting those Mango earrings – which I love by the way – whilst simultaneously illustrating their Stories with chic line drawings. And we all know that once something has made it big on Instagram, we’ll be damned if we can’t turn it into a mainstream trend.

Drawing the line…

Joking aside, line drawing has quickly become a trend with creative folks and the mainstream alike. It’s simplicity fits in perfectly with the minimalist crowd, whilst also appealing to something bolder. It’s no surprise that such a versatile trend has made it big in both the fashion and interior design industries.

I myself have fallen for it numerous time, as is made evident by my Christmas and birthday wishlists. In fact I love it so much that I decided to write a whole blog post on it. I even plan to spread the love further by showing you how you can bring a piece of the trend to your wardrobe, and or home.

Add a bit of line drawing to your life

I’ve chosen some of my favourite pieces by independent stores, artists and brands below, for both the home and your personal style.

Style

Home interior

See, it really is quite easy to bring a little bit of line drawing into your life. Perhaps it’s a one-off sweater, or maybe you’re more of a quirky vase kinda person. Whatever takes your fancy, you can be sure that you’ll be on-trend and looking pretty damn stylish whilst you do it.

Whilst you’re here, why not check out more of my home and style posts.
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The Christmas Hygge Gift Guide

Hygge Gift GuideI’m all about that hygge lifestyle. Whereas the trend may have died down in the UK, I’ve continued to adopt the concept. I believe in the art of slow living, and I’m always trying to bring a little bit of it into my home and life. I also know that a lot of my readers have a similar outlook. So for my second instalment in my Christmas gift guide series I decided to go with something a little different. Here is ‘The Hygge Gift Guide’, and it’s jam packed full of awesome products to bring some warmth, cosiness and comfort into your Christmas.

The Hygge Gift Guide

It wasn’t easy breaking such an intricate concept into three categories, but I don’t think I did too bad a job, right? A cosy home is the perfect place to start, shortly followed by plenty of comforting food & drink. And last but certainly not least, some lifestyle items to keep you going in and outside of the house. As always, I have placed an emphasis on quality items from a selection of independent stores and makers, as well as some well-known brand names. With this gift guide, you’re bound to impress any hygge fan.

If you enjoyed The Hygge Gift Guide, check out the rest of my Christmas Gift Guide series.

Hygge Gift Guide Hygge Gift Guide Hygge Gift Guide Hygge Gift Guide Hygge Gift Guide

The Art of Slow Living: Is It Possible In London?

slow livingSlow Living: Is It Possible In London?

Several years ago I decided to up and change the way I looked at my approach to life. Basically I wasn’t happy. I decided that I was moving too fast, and I needed a break. That meant looking at the way I live, and the everyday things I do. A lifestyle and mentality rebrand, if you will. But let’s be honest, nothing is that straight forward. And is it even possible to incorporate slow living into a London lifestyle?

Slow Living in London

Over the past year I set out to try and find a way to bring the lifestyle concept of slow living into…well, my life. Our society is based on fast fashion, fast food, and even fast lifestyles. If you’re not living fast, then you’re not living at all. At least that’s what people say. I soon realised it wasn’t going to be easy, and the hardest part was figuring out what ‘slow living’ even meant to me.

  1. Stop being so materialistic. I told myself it’s good to have nice things, but it doesn’t mean anything if they have no value, and I don’t mean monetary. I’m talking about objects/experiences that have meaning. Like the expensive pair of sneakers I had wanted for years, which I finally bought myself with the first pay check from my new job.
  2. Quality over quantity. Whereas before I probably bought myself an item of clothing or went to a new restaurant every week, now I do it about once or twice a month. I put more thought into what I want/need, and the design and quality of the piece. I’d rather spend a little more on something that lasts longer and works better, than buy a bajillion items that don’t.
  3. Enjoying the little things. Because sometimes having a G&T by candlelight at home with my friends is much more mentally rewarding than going to the latest ‘on-trend’ bar, and wasting a ton of money on overpriced drinks.
  4. Slowing down my lifestyle. Admittedly this has been the hardest step out of them all, and it’s something I’m still working on today. A lot of people in London can’t (or won’t) grasp the concept of it, and it’s understandable when you live in a city that pulls you in all directions. After a rather successful end to 2016, the first half of 2017 was pretty rough for me. But I’m now trying to get myself back on track again. It may take some time, but if something is worth doing, it’s worth doing well.

You can follow my attempt at ‘slow living’ and read more of my help posts here.

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The Parla Pop-up is a Minimalist’s Dream

parla pop-upParla Pop-up | Nearest tube: Notting Hill Gate | Map

I get a little bit giddy anytime a favourite brand of mine expands. Especially when that brand is an independent one, with a strong emphasis on talented females. Enter Pärla, an East London store based in Boxpark Shoreditch, whom you may remember from some of my previous posts. I’ve been chatting about the brand online – and off – for a while now, which makes their new pop-up even sweeter for me.

Being the fangirl that I am, I decided to go check out the Parla pop-up as soon as it opened. And I don’t think I’m going to be the only one falling in love with it.

The Summer Parla Pop-Up

Pärla may have started with an East London store, but some of you will be glad to hear that they’re now expanding West. Yep, their special Summer pop-up is based in none other than the famous Portobello Road, Notting Hill. The new pop-up is airy, bright, and filled with contemporary jewellery and gorgeous lifestyle items (including lingerie and candles). The usual jewellery design players are all there: V Jewellery, Jessie Harris, Clarice Price Thomas, Smith/Grey, and more. And this time they’ve been joined by a few fashion designers too, such as Danielle Foster, Jody Shafton and others.

I personally can’t stop by Pärla without adding a hundred things to my wish-list, and buying several of the ones already on it. This time I added a piece of V Jewellery to my collection; a little bling to perk up the numerous ear piercings I’m stacking up. And naturally I added everything from Clarice Price Thomas and Jessie Harris’s new collections to my wish-list. It’s safe to say that the new Parla Pop-up is everything I had hoped for, and I can honestly say it’s a minimalists lifestyle dream.

You can visit the Parla Pop-up yourself at 201 Portobello Road, until Sept 3rd.

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Has London Made Me A Brutalist ? | Style

brutalistTop: Zara | Culottes: Warehouse* | Bag: A.P.C. | Earrings: COS | Watch: Paulin Watches

Being English often comes with the stereotype of being super polite, and not always saying what you mean. For a lot of people – including myself – this is pretty accurate. Of course this is also accompanied by the habit of saying ‘sorry’ to inanimate objects, or anyone who bumps into you. As well as an extremely great sense of humour, I’d like to add. So you know, it has it’s up and downs.

But living in London is another thing entirely. You see, us Londoners apparently have a whole other stereotype attached to us, and it ain’t a nice one. In fact I often wonder if London has made a bit of a brutalist over the last few years. 

London Life & Becoming A Brutalist

Living in Japan was pretty easy for me – a society full of etiquette and strong manners, most of which are similar to English ones. But even in my short time there I picked up a few new habits. Little things like gestures, and words that explain things you can’t express in English. So if I was able to pick these up in such a short amount of time, it seems only logical that I have picked up some new traits since moving to London 5 years ago.

Everyone tells you that you’ll change once you move to London. The general consensus outside of the big smoke is that Londoner’s are rude people who only look out for themselves. Personally I don’t think this is true. I do think you have to have a harder shell here (commuting is a bitch). And even though I can’t just start up a conversation with the stranger sat next to me on the bus, my life is full of friendly, kind, and generally awesome people. All of us Londoners.

So maybe it’s true to a certain extent, but at the end of the day I don’t think I’ve lost myself. Because truth be told my personality is still about 50% English, 50% Londoner…and 10% awkward weirdo.

Check out my previous style posts here
Photos of me are by Van Anh Le Thi

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