24 Hours in Monaco | A Travel Guide

24 Hours in MonacoIt can be pretty tough visiting a new city, or country. You’re not sure where to eat, what to see, or even where to stay. Well I’m here to change all of that with my handy guides! They’re full of tips, tricks, and the best places to go. So stop worrying about how you’re going to make the most of your time in a new place; here are my recommendations for spending 24 hours in Monaco!

24 hours in monaco

24 Hours in Monaco

  • Drive to Monaco
    • Monaco is pretty small, and expensive. Unless you want to go all out, I’d suggest staying somewhere close by and driving into the principality.
  • Brunch at Café de Paris
    • This brasserie is world famous, and you’ve probably spotted it in a movie or two. Sit outside on the terrace and mingle with the rich & famous, whilst you enjoy coffee and pastries.
  • Check out that architecture!
    • For such a small place, Monaco has a surprisingly eclectic mix of architecture. From old palatial hotels, to modern apartments, and bridges sandwiched between cliffs.
  • Visit the Prince’s Palace
    • The Prince’s Palace overlooks the bay of Monaco, and it’s a stunning sight…as proven by the 100os of selfies taken there every day.
  • Wander the streets
    • The palace is situated amongst several quaint streets, each littered with gelaterias, stereotypical souvenir shops, and restaurants.
  • Eat ice cream by the harbour
    • Because who doesn’t want to stare out onto a beautiful crystal blue sea covered with yachts…
  • Go hunting for art!
    • Monaco’s streets are literally covered in art. From traditional statues, to modern google-eyed fun. It’s a must-see for any art lover in town.
  • Do dinner in Nice
    • Nice isn’t too far from Monaco, but it’s considerably bigger, and has a lot more restaurants on offer. Such as La Femme du Boulanger.

Well there you have it, my travel guide to 24 Hours in Monaco!
And don’t forget to check out the my other 24 Hours In… guides.

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24 Hours in Oslo, Norway | A Travel Guide

24 Hours in OsloIt can be pretty tough visiting a new city, or country. You’re not sure where to eat, what to see, or even where to stay. Well I’m here to change all of that with my handy guides! They’re full of tips, tricks, and the best places to go. So stop worrying about how you’re going to make the most of your time in a new place; here are my recommendations for spending 24 hours in Oslo, Norway!

24 Hours in Oslo

24 Hours in Oslo, Norway

  • The best banana bread in town!
    • Is found at Supreme Roastworks, alongside some pretty superb coffee too. It makes for the perfect breakfast.
  • Walk along Grünerløkka
    • The latest trendy area in Oslo is somewhat akin to London’s Shoreditch. You’ll find a variety of independent stores, designers, coffee shops and restaurants.
  • Coffee stop!
    • Grab some caffeine to go from Tim Wendelboe – the coffee is high quality, as is the well thought out interior of this popular spot.
  • Architecture fans will love…
    • Oslo City Hall. Tours do run but only during certain parts of the year. However you can wander in freely and walk around the gorgeous interiors.

24 Hours in Oslo

  • Have Lunch in Aker Brygge
    • One of Oslo’s newest developments, the harbour side district is full of restaurants, cafes and shops.
  • Take in some modern art at Astrup Fearnley 
  • Take a boat around the Oslo Fjords
    • Littered with beautiful islands, stunning landmarks, and enviable Summer houses, the Oslo Fjords shouldn’t be missed. Tours run throughout the day, and start from the port in front of Oslo City Hall. Times depend on season.
  • Vippa for dinner!
    • Vippa is Oslo’s leading street food market, and you’ll find friends, couples and families enjoying a variety of cuisines alongside the sea front.

24 Hours in Oslo

Hints and Tips for 24 Hours in Oslo:

  • Stay in an Airbnb
    • You can choose something that suits your personal style, and it’s much more affordable than a hotel. We stayed in Inga’s stunning apartment.
  • Free wifi & charging in the streets
    • Look out for the smart benches littered across the city. They have USB charging ports, and free wifi!
  • It’s expensive, but…
    • Yes, Oslo is expensive but you can get your tax back on a variety of goods including clothes, homeware and food. Just ask for a tax form when purchasing your goods, and get your tax back at the airport.
  • Alcohol
    • Spirits & wine are only sold at Vinmonopolet stores. Everything else is available in supermarkets, but isn’t sold after 6pm on a Saturday, or at all on a Sunday. However restaurants and bars serve as normal.

Well there you have it, my travel guide to 24 Hours in Oslo, Noway!
And don’t forget to check out the my other 24 Hours In… guides.

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24 Hours in Aarhus, Denmark | A Travel Guide

24 Hours in AarhusIt can be pretty tough visiting a new city, or country. You’re not sure where to eat, what to see, or even where to stay. Well I’m here to change all of that with my handy guides! They’re full of tips, tricks, and the best places to go. So stop worrying about how you’re going to make the most of your time in a new place; here are my recommendations for spending 24 hours in Aarhus, Denmark!

24 Hours in Aarhus

24 Hours in Aarhus, Denmark

  • Do breakfast at Bills Coffee 
    • The Danes know their coffee, but they know their pastries even better. And Bills Coffee won’t let you down on either front. They offer up the best pastries in town (in my opinion), and a relaxing atmosphere. Don’t be afraid to chat to the staff – who are super lovely – they’re full of great recommendations.
  • Tour Aarhus City Hall
    • If there’s one thing you don’t want to miss in Aarhus, it’s the city hall tour. This architectural marvel is the epitome of Danish design. You can find photos and tour information here.
  • Enlighten your senses at ARoS
    • The art museum features an array of amazing artwork, and possibly the world’s most colourful rooftop.
  • Refuel at La Cabra, Coffee Roasters
    • This ridiculously stylish coffee shop also offers up plenty of fresh, local produce. My recommendation: the crayfish sandwich, which is hands down the most delicious sandwich I’ve ever had!
  • Fancy some retail therapy?
    • The streets around Vestergade are littered with independent designers, well known brands, and Magasin department store.

24 Hours in Aarhus

  • Take a bus out to the Deer Park
    • Just a 10min ride from the central bus station is Dyrehaven (Deer Park). This piece of woodland is open to the public, but you’ll have to share your walk with some of Aarhus’s friendly deer – and there are lots of them!
  • Stop by the beach!
    • The woodland borders the Kattegat sea by Dyrehaven, and it’s absolutely beautiful. There are showers and changing facilities for those who are brave enough to take a dip.
  • Choose street food for dinner
    • Conveniently located next door to the bus station is the Aarhus Street Food market. You’ll find a wide variety of cuisines, including traditional Danish food. But don’t fork out on the alcohol, instead…
  • Finish the night at a local craft beer bar
    • Mig og Ølsnedkeren is a cozy – some might even say hygge – spot, filled with groups of young stylish friends and couples. Their main offering is a variety of specialised craft beer, but don’t worry they also serve other drinks.

24 Hours in Aarhus

If you have some extra time…

  • Visit Den Gamle By
    • A must-visit for budding architecture nerds and historians alike. Den Gamle By is a small recreation of a Danish town throughout the years, including houses, shops and more.
  • Pop by the Botanical Gardens
    • Nestled right next door to Den Gamle By, and with free entry too! It’s small, but worth a visit – especially for the butterfly room!

Well there you have it, my travel guide to 24 Hours in Aarhus, Denmark!
And don’t forget to check out the my other 24 Hours In… guides.

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24 Hours In Barcelona | A Barcelona Travel Guide

barcelona travel guide

Having friends in different countries can be heartbreaking at the worst of times, but incredibly exciting at the best of times. So when one of my close friends moved to Barcelona last year, I kept telling myself – this is just another excuse to travel. And I wasn’t lying, because this Summer we headed over to Spain to pay them a visit. It was my first time in Barcelona, but luckily I had the best tour guides in town. So here’s my Barcelona travel guide to 24 hours in Europe’s hottest city!*

barcelona travel guide

24 Hours in Barcelona: A Barcelona Travel Guide

  • The only place worth brunching
    • Caravelle is renowned for their brunches – and coffee – in Barcelona. If you love food, this is where you should start your day. I found them via BCN Best Coffee (they do other guides too).
  • Wander around Las Ramblas
    • It may be a bit touristy, but Las Ramblas has some great shopping, and even better markets.
  • Sip coffee with the Devil
    • Satan’s coffee corner is the perfect pit stop. Great coffee, and some interesting Japanese-inspired food.
  • Take a wander around the back streets
    • Satan’s coffee is perfectly located amongst some gorgeous back streets and alleys. Take a wander, you never know what you might find.

barcelona travel guide

  • Breathe in some art
    • Everyone and anyone knows Gaudi. So whether you’re a fan of art, architecture, or you just fancy walking around some pretty cool surroundings in the sunshine, Park Guell is a must-visit.
    • Tip: Book your tickets online before you leave. You’ll need to turn up at a specific time slot, and tickets sell out hours beforehand at the park itself.
  • Basque in your dinner
    • And your beautiful surroundings at El Nacionale. The Instagram worthy building features a selection of Barcelona’s best food. You’re spoilt for choice here.
  • End the night with a view
    • …and a gin and tonic, at Barcelo Raval Hotel’s 360 Terrace. Walk around and take in the whole of Barcelona by night.

Feel free to leave your own Barcelona travel recommendations in the comments.
And don’t forget to check out my other travel posts!

*As much as I’d like to, I can’t genuinely confirm whether this is the hottest city in Europe or not…it probably isn’t.

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24 Hours In Copenhagen | A Copenhagen Travel Guide

copenhagen travelOne of my favourite travel adventures this year has been my trip to Copenhagen. My first foray into Scandinavia. Well, unless you count watching Scandi-dramas, reading endless design books, and a perpetual desire for Danish pastries. Yes, I was over the moon to finally be here – I’m totally a Scandiphile – and trust me, I had an awesome time. So without further ado, here’s my Copenhagen travel guide to help you through your 24 hours in the City of Cool!

copenhagen travel

24 Hours in Copenhagen: A Copenhagen Travel Guide

  • Stay at: an Air Bnb in ‘Indre By’
    • Hotels can be crazy expensive in Copenhagen, but have no fear, Air Bnb is here! Prices are more than affordable, and you get to stay with some of the locals – it’s win, win.
    • Otherwise known as the Downtown Copenhagen or simply K, Indre By is as central as it gets. Park yourself here and you’ll be right in the middle of it all. We stayed in Strøget – an area with plenty of shops, restaurants and things to do. I’d also recommend areas such as Frederiksberg & Vesterbro.
  • Have a Danish for breakfast 
    • Come on, you can’t come all this way without trying one of the countries most famous foods. Trust me, these are nothing like the ones you’ve had at home. They’re found in most cafes, and pair perfectly with a coffee.
    • Tip: try the Kanelsnegl from Vores Broed.
  • Grab a bike! 
    • Copenhagen is very cycle friendly. Every road has a designated lane for cyclists, with some areas only accessible by bike. It’s safe and easy to navigate, as well as being a fast way to get around the city. I’d recommend Donkey Republic – bikes that you can lock/unlock with your phone, for only £6 a day!

copenhagen travel

  • Go up the Rundertaarn (Round Tower)
    • This beautiful 17th century tower is only £3 to enter, and features a round “staircase” and a lovely view from the top. The inside is so Instagram-able though, you may not want to leave.
  • Pop into Trinitatis Church
    • Next door to the Rundertaarn is a beautiful example of Danish architecture – Trinitatis Church. It’s free to enter, and open to all.
  • Have lunch at: Torvehallerne
    • This street food market offers up some of the best food in CPH. If you want something entirely Danish, try Hallernes Smørrebrød. These open sandwiches are packed full of ingredients, and flavour. Tip: grab a few and share.
    • Stop by The Coffee Collective after for an espresso. You know, to keep you going.
  • Check out the view from Christiansborg Palace
    • The former palace, now parliament, allows you to go up the viewing tower for free. The view is breathtaking, and on a good day you can see Sweden (including The Bridge). The restaurant below offers up delicious food, presented beautifully. Again, with a view.

copenhagen travel

  • Take a Boat Tour from Nyhavn
    • Nyhavn is probably the most photographed of all Copenhagen. Boat tours run on a regular basis here, but I’d suggest Nettobådene (the small white kiosk opposite Charlottenborg Fonden). They run every hour, and cost only £4.80. Tip: these are half the price of others, but they do the exact same tour.
  • Shop til you drop in Strøget
    • Or at least until you have to catch your flight. Strøget features a variety of shops, all in central CPH, and only 15mins from the airport. You’ll find Danish brands and stores such as Mads Nørgaard, Naked, and Illums (the best department store in the world tbh). The Hay House is also in Strøget, and is definitely worth wasting your time in.
  • Try the Flæskesteg at Københavner-caféen
    • Københavner-caféen serves up traditional Danish dishes, in a relaxed environment. You must must must try the Flæskesteg (roast pork) – it’s super Danish, and incredibly tasty.

Feel free to leave your own Copenhagen travel recommendations in the comments.
And don’t forget to check out my other travel posts – More Copenhagen posts coming soon!

copenhagen travel

24 Hours in Paris | A Paris Travel Guide

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It’s been a while since I last mentioned anything Parisian on the blog. After living there for 4 months I think I needed a bit of a break. Well it’s been several years since my last visit, but last week I found myself in Paris again. The problem? I only had 24 hours! You know me, whenever I visit somewhere I like to do as much as possible. That’s a given. I also like to share my adventures with everyone on my blog…

So here’s my Paris travel guide to help you through your 24 hours in the City of Love!

paris travel

24 Hours in Paris: A Paris Travel Guide

  1. Stay at: The Pullman Hotel, Eiffel Tower
    • Not only is the location amazing – it’s right next door to the Eiffel Tower! I dare you to find a better view from a hotel window.
  2. Have breakfast at: Cafe Kitsune, Palais Royale
    • If you’re anything like me, then you need a coffee to get you going in the morning. What better way to do this then in the gorgeous surroundings of Palais Royale. You’ll find Cafe Kitsune hidden in the 17th century arcade, with seating in the gardens.
  3. Take a photo at Les Deux Plateaux (Colonnes de Buren)
    • This controversial art piece is only a minute walk from Cafe Kitsune – I do like to make it easy for you, don’t I. Whether you’re a fan or not, this candy cane-esque installation leaves an impression. It’s pretty popular with locals and tourists alike, thanks to being so damn Instagrammable.
  4. Have lunch at: Aki Boulanger, Rue Saint Anne
    • This Japanese-French bakery-cum-cafe boasts some delicious treats, and is only a 10 minute walk from Opera metro station. You’ll find plenty of savoury and sweet food, all with nods towards the French location, and Japanese heritage. Think matcha mille-feuilles.
  5. Walk around Avenue de l’Opéra
    • It’s a beautiful part of Paris, which features some amazing architecture, and plenty of cafes and stores. Galeries Lafayette and Sephora are also nearby, and are a must-visit for any beauty or fashion fans.
  6. Have dinner at the local brasserie
    • You don’t get much more French than a brasserie, and luckily they’re an affordable way to try some decent, traditional French food. You’ll find them dotted around most streets. Chose the one with the bevy of Parisians sat outside, take a seat, and people watch.
  7. Stay up and watch the light show
    • After dark, the Eiffel Tower lights up every hour, on the hour. It’s a spectacular sight, and well worth waiting up for.

Feel free to leave your own Paris recommendations in the comments.
And don’t forget to check out my other travel posts.
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Paris TravelParis Travel

 

24 Hours in Tokyo | Japan Travel Diary

24 hours in tokyo24 Hours in Tokyo | Japan Travel Diary

Yes, the frequently asked question “What do I do with 24 hours in Tokyo?”. Ok let’s be realistic, unless you’re on a stopover, you’re unlikely to only have one day in this exciting city. However, it can be difficult to decide where to visit, what to eat etc. So when faced with the task I like to think of all the places I would visit if I only had a short period of time in a city.

24 Hours in Tokyo: Harajuku

As cliche as it is, it wouldn’t be worth stopping by Harajuku without a walk down Takeshita Dori (take the metro exit of the same name). Grab some cute stationary from Daiso, pick up some vintage designer goods in the back streets, try one of the famous crepes for breakfast, and just generally basque in the atmosphere. It’s fun and it’s fast.

For those who prefer something more chilled, Meiji Jingu is just behind the Omotesando Exit of Harajuku station. It’s one of the most famous shrines in Japan, and is well worth a visit. Located in a small woodland, it’s hard to tell whether you’re still in bustling Tokyo or not. If you hang around for a while, you may even see a traditional Japanese wedding taking place.

From Harajuku you can walk/hop on a train to…

24 Hours in Tokyo: Shibuya

Famous for it’s giant crossing, you really should try and get to high ground just to witness it. Even if that means stopping by Starbucks for one of their limited edition Japanese drinks. Afterwards, head to 109 for some retail therapy before checking out “Basketball St” and one of the various arcades. You must do purikura (Japanese photo booth)!

Stop by Nabe-zo for lunch, and all-you-can-eat Shabu Shabu (hotpot with thinly sliced meat). I’d suggest the sukiyaki and collagen soups. The staff here are helpful, and the meat is in abundance, so don’t be shy about asking for more. They’ll even replace your soups…if you can manage to finish them that is.

24 Hours in Tokyo: Asakusa

Asakusa is a haven for traditional Japan. Head through the large red gates of Senso-ji, and walk amongst the market stalls. Buy some Amazake (a sweet alcoholic drink made from rice), a side of Senbei (traditional rice crackers), and maybe a mask of your favourite childhood character. The souvenirs here are great for taking home to family. The shrine itself is beautiful, and the grounds ditto. Take your time here and find your inner Buddhist.

If you’re a stationary fan, make time to visit Kakimori for handmade, Japanese stationary. Afterwards, take a walk down Kappabashi-dori, a street famous for kitchenware and plastic food models. Pick up a bacon bookmark, or a pancake keychain etc.

Finally, go for dinner at Sometaro. This Okonomiyaki (savoury pancake) restaurant has been around since the 1930s, and it hasn’t changed much since. The friendly staff speak English, and can offer an English menu also. They’ll even show you how to prepare this must-try dish yourself. Truth be told all of the fillings here are delicious, but pork and seafood are great go-tos.

Of course there’s plenty more to do in Tokyo! Keep an eye out for more Japan Travel Diaries soon.
I’d also suggest checking out Alice’s Tokyo Travel Guides and Park and Cube’s 3 Days in Tokyo.

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