Girl Power Doesn’t Come with a Price Tag | Style

Girl PowerTop: Zara | Culottes: Zara | Necklace: Crux | Earrings: COS | Sneakers: Adidas Superstar

I’ve been wanting to write a post about fashion and feminism for the longest time. But every time I put pen to paper – or fingers to keys in my case – I find myself with writers block. See, I’ve got all these ideas and opinions going around in my head, but I just can’t seem to write them down. Well, in an articulate way. Somehow I don’t think ‘feminism is good, innit’ really gets my point across.

Girl Power Doesn’t Come with A Price Tag

You see I have such conflicting views about the fashion industry and feminism. Let’s be realistic, the fashion industry is still pretty behind (read: archaic) when it comes to equality. But at the same time, fashion helps empower people everyday. And of course there are some really awesome designers out there fighting for equality in different ways. Shout-out to Chitose Abe, The Reformation and Sharmila Nair – and that’s only naming a few.

Then there’s the controversy behind Dior’s recent Summer 2017 collection. Should we all be wearing t-shirts that declare just how proud we are to be a feminist? Sure, why not, there’s no harm in it either way. But girl power shouldn’t come with a price tag. And if it does, it should certainly be for a higher cause. Or bluntly put, a £490 t-shirt should at least donate part (or all) of their proceeds to a charity working towards equality. Otherwise you just come across as a brand that’s capitalising on something that negatively affects people’s lives everyday. Which let’s be honest, wouldn’t be a first for the fashion industry.

So you do you and wear your girl power t-shirt, or trousers, dress…whatever! Because whatever you wear you’re still a feminist, and that’s pretty kick ass. But Dior, you can stuff your ‘feminist’ t-shirts, I don’t need them. I’ll wear my feminism on my sleeve without the price tag, thanks.

Check out my previous style posts here

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  • I can understand your point, but for some people, Dior IS an affordable brand. Being affluent isn’t a crime, nor should they be ashamed. You are not a “bad” feminist for not wearing a brand name shirt, but you are not a better feminist either. What we wear and how we express ourselves should have nothing to do with how we treat others. Feminism should be about how we treat others, in my opinion.

    I hope my point comes across clearly. I’m not disagreeing with you, exactly, but perhaps seeing it from a different point of view. You can be a rich feminist, a broke feminist wearing a burlap sack, but as long as you are fighting for equality, you are both good feminists. (P.S., I actually did not follow the Dior show so if there is any background news, I am unaware and am responding purely to what you have presented in your post)

    Anyway, I do continue to enjoy your blog a lot! ^u^v Been following you for years so I hope you don’t find this to be an attack of any sort!

    ~Sparklewolfie
    abc-lolita.blogspot.com

    • Actually I agree with you. You can wear whatever you want and be a feminist. My gripe is more with these brands that are using feminism to sell their products, without actually doing anything to help the cause. It would have been great to see Dior donate some of the proceeds to a charity helping fight for equality. Or even just be vocal about feminism really. Unfortunately (to me) it just comes across as a marketing tactic. Maybe I could have put that across better in my post.

      And thank you for commenting. I didn’t take it as a personal attack at all. In fact I really appreciate that you took the time to discuss your POV on the subject. I think we’re pretty much aligned in our thoughts on the matter actually haha

      • Oh, I’m glad to see we actually are agreeing ^u^ Yes, I understand your point of using a cause to sell a product without actually helping. I had a similar rant years ago about the facebook trend of sexualizing breast cancer and selling breast-themed items to “raise awareness” without actually giving proceeds to any foundations.

        I do think it’s good you made this post in general, anyway. It opens up a discussion and it made me think about this in a way I would not have thought of before.

        • You’re so right. Awareness is important, but when it comes to monetary gain it’s a different thing altogether.

          I’ve added an extra sentence in to the post now, which might help clarify my point. It’s so difficult trying to talk about something so intricate without write a 4 page essay haha

          Thank you!

          • So true!

            It’s difficult to write about serious topics without risking some type of comment war >_<;; I tend to avoid the comments sections on other blogs about serious topics for this reason, and even installed a Youtube comment blocker extension on Chrome!

            I think you worded your thoughts pretty well considering how concise it was though ^u^v

  • Sukie Joe

    If black off shoulder dress keeps women a sense of mystery.Then light green chiffon dress shows the neat and pure of a girl.